SoaringSuperheroes

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Greatness is in everyone. Strength is in everyone. There’s an entire galaxy of stars, kids just like you who want to do something nice to make ill kids feel loved and supported. Everyone has a favorite action-hero or superhero. Which one is yours?  You can invent your own Superhero or choose a famous Superhero to share with ill kids. Your Superhero can be funny and have silly powers that can make an ill child smile and laugh. Your Superhero can be brave and strong, which can make an ill child feel less scared. Your Superhero can be really kind, which can make an ill child feel comforted. Its up to your imagination!

How to Get Started:
1. Choose what kind of Superhero you want to make: 
a)  Invent your own Superhero
b)  Choose a famous Superhero 
c)  Pick a hero or heroine from mythology 
d)  Select someone from real life.  This person can be someone you  know from your family, school, neighborhood, or someone  famous from the past or present.

2. Use Soaringwords Border to draw your Superhero.

3. Write the name of your Superhero on the top of the page and then draw your Superhero using lots of colors.

4. Write one or two sentences describing his or her superpowers. You can also write a message to an ill child from your Superhero.

5. Write your name and age on the bottom of the page.

IRB Senior Banana SoaringSuperhero

To see lots of examples of Superheroes created by kids like you, click here.

Pointers:
Do make your picture really big, bright and colorful. Fill the entire page with your picture and message.
Don’t include illness or death in your Superhero description.
Don’t write or draw anything violent.
Don’t write “Get Well Soon” or “Feel Better” because sometimes these messages can make an ill kid feel sad.

After You Finish Your Superhero:
You can give your Superhero to a child who is ill. Or, you can mail or email it to Soaringwords and we will share your Superhero with a hospitalized child and/or post it on our website.
Soaringwords, 
5 West 86th Street, Suite 1500
New York, N.Y. 10024
 heal@soaringwords.org

Watch SoaringSuperheroes video to see other kids create their hero messages:

Character Strengths

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chracter strengths 7.30.14

Why Character Strengths matter.

What are the unique traits that differentiate one person from another?
What is “the essence of me” that makes me unique and unlike anyone else?

Throughout history, these questions have been asked by leading philosophers and thinkers such as Aristotle. In addition, over the centuries, the world’s great religions, hundreds of cultures, and modern scientists have examined and valued character strengths. Character strengths and virtues are capabilities that humans have for thinking, feeling and behaving (Peterson and Seligman, 2004). These unique character strengths are the way we separate ourselves from animals and display our virtues or human essence.

Modern scientists have come up with a list of 24 character strengths:

1.Creativity (originality, ingenuity)
2.Curiosity (interest, novelty-seeking, openness to experience)
3.Judgment (critical thinking)
4.Love of Learning
5.Perspective (wisdom)
6.Bravery (valor)
7.Perseverance (persistence, industriousness)
8.Honesty (authenticity, integrity)
9.Zest (vitality, enthusiasm, vigor, energy)
10.Love
11.Kindness (generosity, care, compassion, altruistic love, “niceness”)
12.Social Intelligence (emotional intelligence, personal intelligence)
13.Teamwork (citizenship, social responsibility, loyalty)
14.Fairness
15.Leadership
16.Forgiveness
17.Humility
18.Prudence
19.Self-Regulation (self-control)
20.Appreciation of Beauty and Excellence (awe, wonder, elevation)
21.Gratitude
22.Hope (optimism, future-mindedness, future orientation)
23.Humor (playfulness)
24.Spirituality (faith, purpose)

Strength and greatness are inside of everyone. Each person is different from everyone else. Today you are going to pick a character strength that reminds you of you!

We want you to think of your own ideas to illustrate your character strength. Use your imagination!

Here’s How to Get Started:

1. Choose a Character Strength that describes you. Check out the VIA Character Strength website for ages 10-17 and adults.
2. Write the name of your Character Strength on the top of the page and then draw your Character Strength on the Soaringwords Border, using lots of colors.
3. Write your name and age on the bottom.

Pointers:

Do fill the entire page with your picture and message.
Do make your picture really bright and colorful.

character-strengths-form

 

SoaringFables®

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Fables are a type of story or legend that have been passed down from generation to generation. In countries all around the world, they are well-known stories that have been told for years and years. Each fable has a motto or lesson at the end of the fable that teaches us something. You too can write a fable and join the thousands of children who have enjoyed making fables for hospitalized children. We know that they will love reading the special fable you wrote just for them.

Whether you are in a hospital, in school or at home, we recommend that you write your fable with another person or a few people. Together you can think of the main idea for the story and then each of you can take a turn writing a sentence or drawing an illustration.

Before you start writing your fable please watch the video below.

 

Fables from Aesop have been animated and adopted by Tom Lynch. If you would like to watch individual fables again, just click here and select which fable you want to watch.

Recommended Steps for Writing Your Fable:

1. We recommend that all the main characters of your fable be animals. Use attached worksheet to help you choose your animals and their characteristics. You can give them human qualities like the ability to drive a car, to talk on the phone, to laugh, to dance, or to build a house.

2. Think about the plot or action of your fable. What is the plot or the action of the story? If you are working with one person or a group take turns writing one sentence at a time.

3. Think about the moral or motto of your fable. This is the lesson that you want everyone to understand when they are done reading your fable. To see examples of fables created by kids like you, click here .

Pointers:
Do write your fable ideas and paragraphs on a piece of scrap paper first, so you can cross things out and play with different words.
Do use Soaringwords Border to write and illustrate your story.
Do make your picture really big, bright and colorful. Fill the entire page with your picture and message.
Don’t include illness or death in your fable.
Don’t write or draw anything violent.
Don’t write “Get Well Soon” or “Feel Better” because sometimes these messages can make an ill kid feel sad.

aesop_book-300x259

After You Finish Your Fable: You can give your fable to a child who is ill. Or, you can mail or email it to Soaringwords and we will share your fable with a hospitalized child and/or post it on our website. Soaringwords 1 Penn Plaza, 9th Floor New York, N.Y. 10119  heal@soaringwords.org

SoaringHaikus®

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Samantha063-222x300 Giovanna0491-231x300Haiku is a form of poetry invented in Japan. Master poets spent years writing these short poems about nature, animals and feelings. You can be a poet, too. Write a Haiku and draw a picture to make an ill child smile and laugh!

There are only three lines of words in each Haiku. The first line and last line have five syllables in them.

The second line has seven syllables in it. 5 syllables — 7 syllables — 5 syllables. You got it! Great news, Haikus do not have to rhyme.

Here’s How to Get Started:

1. Pick a subject that you want to write about (like dogs or flowers).

2. Write down a few descriptive words about your subject using the 5-7-5 syllable count.

3. After you’ve written the three lines of your Haiku poem, make a large drawing that fills up the entire page, using a lot of colors.

4. Create a title for your Haiku.  It can be mysterious so the reader has to guess what your Haiku is about or it can be very clear.

5. Write your name and age on the bottom of the page.

Pointers: Do use Soaringwords Border to write your Haiku.

Do make sure your words are legible and neat, so that the Haiku can be easily read. Your Haiku may end up on our website! Do use darker colors for the words. Don’t include illness or death in your Haiku. Don’t write “Get Well Soon” or “Feel Better” because sometimes these messages can make an ill kid feel sad.

To see lots of examples of Haikus created by kids like you, click here.

After You Finish Your Haiku: You can give your Haiku to someone who is ill. Or, you can mail or email it to Soaringwords and we will share your Haiku with a hospitalized child and/or post it on our website. Soaringwords 1 Penn Plaza, 9th Floor New York, N.Y. 10119   heal@soaringwords.org Watch SoaringHaiku video to see other kids create their haikus:

SOARING into Strength: Best Possible Future Self Exercise

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Today you are going to think about your best possible future self.

Take a few deep breaths… Take a moment to think about your best possible self and life. It could be you in 6 months, 1 year or 5 years. Imagine that everything has gone as well as it possibly could. Perhaps you have done really well in school. Perhaps you have excelled in a sport, dancing or some physical activity. Maybe you have learned new skills like painting or learning a new language or playing a musical instrument. There are many accomplishments for which you can feel proud.

How do you want to grow? Look? Feel? Who is with you? What makes you really happy? What do you love? Perhaps you have meaningful and happy relationships with your family and friends.

Get a good picture of you as your best possible future self. Now close your eyes and imagine it. When you are ready, open your eyes and start the activities below.

SOARING into Strength: Best Future Self Writing Exercise

Part 1: Use the attached Best Possible Future Self Border to describe your best future self in words. Be as creative and imaginative as you want, using as much detail as you want. This writing can be for just YOU, private, strictly confidential so don’t hold back and edit yourself. Or you can share your best possible future self writing with your parents or a healthcare professional.

Part 2: Now write down a specific goal or goals that would help you attain your best possible self. Sometimes long-term goals seem overwhelming or out of your reach. Every journey begins with just a single step. Think about taking baby steps towards your long-term goal(s). For example, if your goal is to learn a new language, maybe the first step is speaking to someone about getting a tape or book to start practicing. If your goal is to learn how to play a new instrument maybe the first step is to find out about classes in your school or in the community.

SOARING into Strength: Best Future Self Artwork Exercise

Use your creativity and imagination to draw your best future self. Have fun, use lots of colors, we can’t wait to see what you have come up with! Start the journey without worrying too much about the length of the road.

          

*This exercise is inspired by the work of Sonja Lyubomirsky & Shane Lopez

 

 

SoaringJokes and Riddles

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Have you ever heard of the expression, “Laughter is the best medicine.” This means that when people laugh and smile, they relax and the body actually releases chemicals – called endorphins – that make them feel better naturally. When children are young they laugh about 500 times a day, when they grow up they laugh less than five times a day. That’s not funny at all!  Help Soaringwords share more laughter starting right now! Here are simple steps to make joke books filled with SoaringJokes for ill children or for anyone that needs a laugh.

SoaringJoke Book Materials: Index cards (large size). Hole punchers (to put ribbon through or you can just use a binder clip) Ribbon or binder clip to bind the book Markers and crayons to inscribe and decorate the books Stickers to decorate the book covers

 Here is how to get started:

1. Think of some great jokes. Here are few samples of SoaringJokes:
-What do you get when you graduate from scuba diving school? 
A deep-loma
-Where do cows go on holiday?
Moo York
-What do sheep do on sunny days? 
Have a baa-baa-cue!

2. Hole punch a set of 7-8 index cards. Two holes so you can bind it like a book.

3. Make a special cover design on top index card.

4. When you have finished the cover and your dedication page, each index card will become another page in your
Joke Book. Make a hole in each index card. On each index card write a joke. On the front of each page write “Q” or the Question part of the joke. For example, “What is a skunk’s favorite contest?” You can decorate this front page with bubble letters, or choose a different color to write out each word. You can make a picture of the subject of the joke. On the back of this page is your “A” or Answer part of the joke-“A smelling bee!  Ha Ha.” And you can draw a picture of a skunk laughing.

5.  When you are finished creating SoaringJokes Book you can bind it with a ribbon or a binder clip.

If you are in the hospital, you can give your joke book as a gift to somebody who needs a laugh.. your roommate, your favorite nurse or doctor, or someone in your family. If you are doing a Soaringwords volunteer project, you can create joke books to donate to hospitalized children to inspire them to laugh and smile.

Guess Who Zoo

The Guess Who book series is the first children’s book series to be designated as part of the Soaringwords Book Club where children read the books and then are invited to make SoaringRiddles to donate to hospitalized children.  Author Howard Eisenberg will be visiting many of Soaringwords 196 partner hospitals to read Guess Who books to hospitalized children to help them pass the time and enhance their well-being.

The author and Mascot Publishers are proud to cooperate in a program to Buy One, Give One to motivate consumers to purchase an extra set of books to donate to a hospitalized child (Press Release). To purchase your book click here.

Create a SoaringRiddle

Scanned from a Xerox multifunction device001 (1)Riddles are questions or statements phrased to tell its answer and they are usually presented as a game. Riddles are like puzzles and they ask the question: What am I? Many people enjoy riddles because they are fun to tell and even more fun to figure out! The riddle you make will be shared with a child in a hospital to bring laughter and joy to them!

Examples:

1) What is black and white and red all over?
A panda bear with a sunburn.

2) Why do hummingbirds hum?
Because they forgot the words!

3) How do bees get to school?
By school buzz!

4) Why did the turkey cross the road twice?
To prove he wasn’t chicken!

5) Knock Knock!
Who’s there?
“Cowsgo.”
Cowsgo who?
No they don’t, cows go “moo!”

 Click here to see more riddle examples. See what other students from P.S.75 in New York City have created, click here.

Here’s How to Get Started:

  1. Pick an animal from the animal worksheet that you want to be your answer (like a dog or dinosaur).
  2. What does your animal do? What does your animal look like? Write these ideas down.
  3. Draft your riddle. Try reading it to a friend to see if it makes sense. You can re-word it and try again!
  4. Share your riddle with friends and family!
  5. Use the SoaringBorder to write and decorate your riddle.

Pointers:

  • Do use the SoaringBorder to write your Riddle. Fold your border to make a book. (When printing the border press “two-sided copy”.
  • Do make sure your words are legible and neat, so that the Riddle can be easily read. Your Riddle may end up on our website!
  • Do use darker colors for the words and bright colors for your picture.
  • Don’t include illness or death in your Riddle.
  • Don’t write “Get Well Soon” or “Feel Better” because these messages can make an ill kid feel sad.
  • After You Finish Your Riddle: You can give your Riddle to someone who is ill. Or, you can mail it to Soaringwords and we will share it with a hospitalized child.